Wrong in all the Right Ways | Book Review

Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.
Publication Date: J
uly 17, 2018
Price: Kindle –
$9.99
         Hardcover –
$ 12.15
         Paperback –
$10.99

An attraction between foster siblings sets fire to forbidden love in this contemporary reimagining of Wuthering Heights.

Emma’s life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits: her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews.

Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to echo Emily Bronte’s style in an epistolary format. With irrepressible feelings and no one to confide in, she’s got a lot to write about. Distraught by the escalating intensity of their mutual attraction, Emma and Dylan try to constrain their romance to the page—for fear of threatening Dylan’s chances at being adopted into a loving home. But the strength of first love is all-consuming, and they soon get enveloped in a passionate, secretive relationship with a very uncertain outcome.

Tiffany Brownlee’s Wrong in All the Right Ways marks the exciting debut of a fresh voice in contemporary teen fiction.

I obtained this book on a trip to Barnes & Noble. When I stumbled across this book the first thing that caught my attention was the beautiful cover. I was a little nervous at first before picking up this book because I have not read the classic Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. but the description of the book sounded like something I might enjoy. Then, after reading over the description of the book, it seemed like a book I could possibly enjoy, since I like reading young adult books.

Emma comes from the “perfect” family, where failure and disappoint don’t happen. She has conditioned herself to be absolutely perfect at everything she does so she doesn’t let anyone down. Especially her mom or dad. She is a good girl who is very smart and just wants to be off to college as soon as possible. Dylan comes from a broken home and has bounced around with different families, group homes and with family services. He has a dark past and has learned how to keep his feelings bottled up and to himself. He is artistic and uses that ability to let go some of the emotions that he is feeling.

The one thing that drove me absolutely crazy was that Emma constantly kept referring to Dylan as “her brother or foster brother or boyfriend”, like we get it he is your foster brother and your boyfriend. You don’t have to keep saying it on every single page. We understand what is going on between them but to me it felt awkward that she constantly keeps referring to him one of three ways. We get it, that’s why we are reading the story. Address it in the first few chapters and get on with the story without having to refer to him in one of the three ways.

Don’t get me wrong this book is not terrible. But, it feels like there’s no substance to the story. I felt like I was just going through the motions while reading this book. I felt like I was listening to a teenager ramble on about their life for 26 chapters, which is the point and why this book is best suited for teens, ages 13-18 years old! This book was very easy to read but it felt like a Hallmark Christmas movie. Absurd and unrealistic but I just had to finish reading it to see how it ended. I am sure if you like or have read Wuthering Heights by Emily Bront you probably will enjoy this one as well. I am giving this read a ⭐⭐⭐ out of 5 stars!

Follow and connect with Tiffany:

Website: https://tiffanybrownlee.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/astoldbytiffb

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/astoldbytiffb/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TiffanyBrownleeBooks/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17051451.Tiffany_Brownlee

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3 thoughts on “Wrong in all the Right Ways | Book Review

  1. Pingback: January Wrap Up

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